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  • Will Moving to the Commercial Cloud Leave Some Data Users Behind?

    February 7, 2019

    Mariel Borowitz with satellite communications equipment

    A growing volume of information from satellites and other sources is leading many federal agencies to consider commercial cloud services to store and distribute the data. A policy paper published February 7 in the journal Science urges caution about the design of these commercial cloud partnerships and possible imposition of user fees.

     

  • Green New Deal Proposal Overlooks Key Element, Georgia Tech Professor Says

    February 7, 2019

    Marilyn Brown

    The proposal for a “Green New Deal” to achieve a net of zero greenhouse gas emissions in the United States within a decade might be feasible, but would have insufficient impact on climate change so long as U.S. energy producers continued to export coal, oil, and gas around the world, according to leading energy expert Marilyn Brown of the Georgia Institute of Technology.

  • Concrete Better Than Cameras in Protecting Grid, Georgia Tech PHD Finds

    February 7, 2019

    Electrical Substation

    Jenna McGrath, who graduated in December 2018 with a Ph.D. in Public Policy, modeled attacks on a generic substation using software typically used for war gaming and found that concrete and armored transformers may more than high-tech solutions at preventing damage.

  • Georgia Tech Cybersecurity Students Attend CyberCorps Symposium and Job Fair

    January 25, 2019

    CyberCorps logo

    On January 7-8, Georgia Institute of Technology students attended the annual National Science Foundation (NSF) CyberCorps Symposium and Job Fair in Washington, D.C.

    Seymour Goodman, regents professor in the Georgia Tech Sam Nunn School of International Affairs, led the students to the annual cybersecurity symposium, which he has done for previous groups of Georgia Tech students since 2003.

  • POSSE Leads Workshop on Emerging Technology and Risk Reduction

    January 25, 2019

    Adam Stulberg
    The Program on Strategic Stability Evaluation (POSSE) in the Center for Strategy, Technology, and Policy (CISTP) in the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs led a workshop on “Emerging Technology and Risk Reduction” at the King’s College London
  • Robert Rosenberger Takes Message Against Distracted Driving to City Hall

    January 18, 2019

    Robert Rosenberger Speaks At City of Atlanta Distracted Driving Event

    Robert Rosenberger, associate professor in the School of Public Policy, was recently invited by the City of Atlanta Mayor's Office of Workplace Safety to speak at an event on distracted driving. Rosenberger has drawn national attention for his expertise on the subject.

  • History Undergraduate's Article Published in 'Physics in Perspective'

    January 14, 2019

    Physics in Perspective

    Andrew Zhang, a double major in Physics and History, Technology, and Society (HTS), is the first author on the article “Four Facts Everyone Ought to Know about Science: The Two-Culture Concerns of Philip W. Anderson,” published in the Physics in Perspective journal. The article was written with Georgia Insitute of Technology School of Physics Professor Andrew Zangwill, and can be found here.

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